Fingerprints on paper Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Latent Print Examination » General Questions from Non-Fingerprint Experts » Fingerprints on paper « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Angel Vazquez (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: fmdmzpr04-ext.fm.intel.com
Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 - 02:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am also curious if prints can be lifted from regular printing paper that is at least a year old. If so does anyone know of places that could do this for you?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

shannondamron (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69-36-195-52.cot.net
Posted on Wednesday, July 01, 2009 - 07:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have heard many theories relating to Fingerprints left on paper, would fingerprints be present on a piece of paper if it was mishandled and not properly stored for analysis 2 years after it was collected? Example: A piece of paper was collected and stored in a file cabinet in an office or some other "improper" vessel for a duration of 2 or more years?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jessica Coates (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: s0106001c10204fb1.nb.shawcable.net
Posted on Sunday, March 01, 2009 - 03:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How long would a fingerprint/palm print, or a print from any other surface of the hand last on standard lined paper, and would it be possible to lift and separate overlapping fingerprints?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alex Wiedzmin (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: host.mckesson.com
Posted on Tuesday, November 11, 2008 - 11:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

According to the recent research fingerprints can be recovered from difficult surfaces such as paper using disulfur dinitride, which will turn the fingerprint brown no matter what surface it is on.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barbara Anselmo
Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2004 - 07:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you Graham for your response. This was helpful. I stand corrected on my firm thoughts that fingerprints should have without doubt been present.

Thank you again for responding
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Graham Ford
Posted on Sunday, June 06, 2004 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The defense explanation holds some water, but not much.

If a persons hands were clean is not necessarily relevant. Clean hands can leave very good prints on the substrate touched as the sweat is not blocked from the pores by dirt or grease etc. If the hands had been wiped with a handkerchief, rag or tissue paper etc, then there is minimal sweat on the surface of the skin to leave the required deposit on the paper.

Paper is an excellent substrate on which to develop latent prints as it is generally absorbent (thermal papers can be problematical). The sweat deposit from the donor is absorbed into the fibers of the paper and is generally protected. Whether the sweat deposit can be revealed by latent development techniques to disclose sufficient quantity and clarity of information to identify back to the donor will depend on a vast amount of variables. Such as, paucity of latent deposit, does the donor exude sufficient acids and oils that would react with the processing method employed, was the paper well handled by others before being handled by the donor you are trying to identify, was the paper collected and preserved using the correct methods for later laboratory examination, etc., etc.

From your posting you state that (during such a stressful time such as a kidnapping their hands would likely perspire somewhat and leave some mark). This would indicate that you may have a bias (I am not sure of course) and believe that the parents are in someway implicated in the crime. Of course it could also mean that the stress was caused by the loss of their child.

Whether they are guilty or not, some or all of the above mentioned factors may apply, as well as other explanations i.e., if the paper was previously well handled by other parties and subsequently handled by the donors (in this case the parents), their sweat deposit could be masked by the sweat deposits already present on the paper.

It should be no surprise for any fingerprint expert; that a persons prints may not developed sufficiently to individualize, after they had definitely touched the questioned item.

As you say, they may have left some mark on the paper, but if it was not sufficient to react with the processes employed and contained insufficient identifiable ridge characteristic detail to identify, then no firm conclusion can be made.

I was taught back in 1971, that when you examine any items for latent prints, you should always HOPE to find prints, never EXPECT to find them. Just because someone has touched an item, does not mean that you can prove it from a fingerprint perspective.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barbara Anselmo
Posted on Saturday, June 05, 2004 - 12:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a question that I hope someone can help me with

I follow the JonBenet Ramsey murder case and the evidence states that despite the fact that both parents handled the note, NO fingerprints from them were found.

The explanation given by those who defend the parents are that their hands were clean and paper does not hold fingerprints well

I disagree as I would also suspect that during a stressful time such as a "kidnapping" their hands would likely perspire somewhat and leave some mark on paper.

I would appreciate any feedback on this subject.

Thanks
Barbara

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Password:
E-mail:
Action: