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Alyssa Jeanne Lacra (Market24)
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Username: Market24

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2014
Posted on Friday, September 05, 2014 - 02:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi please help me! Can fingerprint recognize even the time was short itís about 2 minutes by touching wallet. Its lunch time then no one around in our office then we get back to work again my boss notice that her wallet is not on her bag then we helped her to look for her wallet then we found out that itís on under her table. Then she decided to do the fingerprint print test but up to now no result. Itís been 4 days since it happened. Somebody help me to answer is it possible to get the fingerprint
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beth harrington (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 203-59-207-214.dyn.iinet.net.au
Posted on Friday, March 13, 2009 - 04:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can a fingerprint last on metal surface that is outside and exposed to weather/heat/humidity/environment for two months... and still be recognizable and be used as a sufficient evidence?
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scott (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: host81-153-70-27.range81-153.btcentralplus.com
Posted on Tuesday, October 03, 2006 - 01:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

How long does a fingerprint last on a tablet and would the print be affected by rubbing against plastic?

Webservant response: Potentially 30 years to indefinitely provided the paper tablet (if that is what you meant) is not exposed to water. If exposed to water/rain/dew, some latent prints may even survive that and be recoverable long afterwards. Paper (especially porous paper, versus shiny magazine cover-like paper) rubbing against plastic normally does not damage latent prints.

Please read the Frequently Asked Questions here.


(Message edited by admin on October 04, 2006)
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collin (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 12.213.112.38
Posted on Thursday, August 24, 2006 - 10:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Someone took money out of my safe and it is not steal or wood. It is rough plastic. Can they catch his finger prints if i already grabed it and opened it how many times.

Webservant response: Yes. Please read the Frequently Asked Questions here.

(Message edited by admin on August 25, 2006)
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Gary W. Jones
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 08:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is no scientific method for determining the age of a latent print.
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Kasey Wertheim
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kris,

There are many factors which could affect how long a fingerprint lasts on an object. It may help you feel better to know a little bit about locating prints on an object. In fact, "latent" prints developed on items are chance impressions. They are composed of oil, perspiration, or other contaminants located on the finger at the time the item is touched. If there is nothing present on the finger, a latent print may not be left even though the item was touched. And even if there was "sweat" present, the surface itself might not be an ideal receptor for holding a fingerprint. Many surfaces (like vinyl for example) are not very likely to retain useable prints because they are semi-porous. They aren't hard like glass or metal, and likewise they do not absorb and retain the sweat like paper or cardboard. And even if the "sweat" and the "surface" factors were good, the touch itself might not lead to a latent print of value. For example, if I touch a piece of glass with a sweaty finger, but I do so with a glancing, sliding motion, all that will develop on the glass is a big smear. If I twist and turn my finger as I touch an item, the "touch" factor may also prevent an identifiable fingerprint from being developed even though I touched the surface. And finally, even if the "sweat" "surface" and "touch" factors are good, "environmental" factors acting on the surface after the fact might prevent an identifiable print from being left. These include temperature, humidity, handling, and packaging. On a hot dry day, an item being handled in a sealed plastic bag is probably not ideal for development of a latent print of value. Most laboratories require items of evidence for latent print processing to be packaged in paper containers for this reason. Paper "breathes" and is much less likely to build up condensation that can destroy fingerprint evidence.

So in review, there are four basic factors as to whether identifiable latent prints will be developed on an item that HAS been touched: sweat, surface, contact, and environment. If any of these factors are not ideal, an identifiable latent print may not be developed on an item that has been touched.

In order to determine how long a print will last, you would have to know what the print was composed of (sweat factor) and also you would need to know more about the surface/sweat interaction. For example, on a shell casing or similar metal object the sweat sometimes oxidizes the metal and forms a permanent "print" on the surface. Wood is a very different surface than metal, so there is no direct answer to your question. There are too many variables.

I hope this helps.
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KRIS
Posted on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 12:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

WHAT WOULD BE THE LONGEST TIME POSS FOR A PRINT ON METAL OR WOOD?

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